“Gamer” flickr photo byokaysamuraiflickr.com/okaysamuraishared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) license

 

     Why do we accept unfinished games? Is it because we are too impatient to wait? What about us wanting to have the newest game? I believe it to be a combination of the two. We are impatient because with all of these new technological advances, it takes longer to create games now than it did in the past with simpler games due to graphics, processing speed, and new features. We want the newest game because as humans we want the best and we want to be able to play a video game that may or may not become the next rave.  

        

Some Examples

AC Unity

     Ahhh good ole Unity. I enjoyed it as much as the next guy, but it wasn’t without it’s problems. There were times I fell through the stage, ran up the side of an asset that I wasn’t trying to run to, and witnessed those horrible scenes where characters were faceless. This being said, a lot of the bugs seem to be more entertaining than game breaking. If you’re looking to get it click here. (I am an affiliate, so I will get a commission but this won’t affect you in any way)

Diabolo III

     I for one remember the experience of the huge server fail at first release. My friend and I stayed up late until about three in the morning. We were excited to log in, and then we kept getting that fatal error. Do you remember that error? Error 3006. The big problem when things like this happen, is that companies don’t allow enough beta testers for stress testing. Maybe one day they can find a way to stress test servers with better success. Diabolo III is getting better. More and more people play it every day. If you want to be one of them, click this link here.

Halo MCC

     Hmm. Where do I start here? MCC had SO many issues at release. It took forever to get into matchmaking, and even then the matches weren’t close in player skill level. It was even difficult to join a party to play with others. Even to this day, it continues to have its problems, which aren’t as bad as they use to be. It’s now very playable, and very fun. If this peaks your interest feel free to find it here.

 

Pros & Cons

Pros

1. We get to play games sooner

2. Bugs can be fixed remotely

3. Some bugs can be entertaining

Cons

1. Unable to complete parts of the game (pending on the bug)

2. This can take away the experience of the game that we may enjoy most

3. It could take a while for a patch or it may not come at all

 
Price Adjustment

    Should they charge us less at the beginning and more later?

     This should depend on the actual game play available and playable. If it’s a short game at first, with no major bugs, sure I’d be happy to pay a little now and more as parts of the game become release. Although if this is the case, wouldn’t this be        considered a ‘beta’ or a ‘demo’? 

Should we pay more for a finished video game?   

     I may hit home for some people here, but I’m going to be totally honest. I would rather pay more for a playable game without anything that can ruin the game play for me than pay normal price for a game that was rushed with so many bugs, that it’s not even worth finishing.  

Worth Waiting For?

Is it better to wait?

     What do you think? Should we just wait longer for a game to be completed or receive a rush release with issues? I for one would rather wait 100%. A great example was how long they put off Mighty No. 9. If you want to release a game sooner, take away some features that are breaking the game, then add them with a paid DLC, game pass, or patch release. 

How long should we wait?

     This is a good question. Some people are patient, while others are not. On top of that, the game companies DO need money to keep running their business. Take the Final Fantasy VII Remake for this example. We’ve been waiting since they’ve first mentioned a release back in 2015. Now they are mentioning that it will finally be released sometime at the end of December 2018 or January 2019. If you would like to order it, look no further. Just click here.

     If no game breaking bugs are discovered, do you think that it would be worth the wait? I do. I’m much happier with waiting a little longer. I think of it this way, there are so many games being developed these days. It gives me plenty of time to catch up on my game list in between major releases. 

Conclusion

Why do we accept this?

     We are being overwhelmed by so much technology, including video games. We have become more impatient now more than ever. We have to get the next best thing. We have to have it right now. Can we come up with a fine line? An agreement to make both parties happy? Maybe one day that just might be possible. 

Let’s end with a quote ~ A delayed game is eventually good, but a rushed game is forever bad – Shigeru Miyamoto

What was the last game that you bought that wasn’t completed? Leave Comments Below

 

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8 thoughts on “Release of Unfinished Games – What’s the solution?

  1. I can totally see that Jaron! It’s either that, or they don’t hire enough testers to test the in’s and out’s of the game. Instead of setting up ‘beta’s’ maybe they just figure out that if they throw their game out into the sharks, they may get lucky and save them some time and money if no major bugs are discovered?

  2. Sometimes I wonder whether another reason that games are released early is because the are to cheap to play test it. They just release it and just wait for the consumers to find the bugs for them. Then they go in and fix the bugs that were found by the community. I don’t know haw true it is but there are games that come out way too buggy.

  3. I think this is a business model that is, unfortunately, taking over the world. People care more about quantity than they do quality and about making the initial quick money than they do about the lifetime supporters who, unfortunately, keep getting dumped on. … It’s like when you were a kid and you had your crush; you’d do anything for them. You’d been friends for a long time but they never thought of you like that and you watch them continually getting in and out of bad relationships. And all you want to do is scream, “I’M RIGHT HERE AND I’LL LOVE YOU FOREVER THE WAY YOU DESERVE,” but you don’t cause that’s not you…… what was I talking about?…. OH YEAH, being ignored for the cash grab. People like quality! People like attention to detail. My understanding in mathematics tells me, if you go too far in either direction, your profits will drop off. There has to be a happy (for everyone) medium. If stuff isn’t ready, be ADULT enough to say it’s not and hold off for a bit till it is! Otherwise, you give foot poisoning to everyone at the party and they’ll all KNOW it was the sausage dip that did them in and they’ll all KNOW it was YOU who DIDN’T cook it!

    BUT, (am I yelling too much?) if there is a goof somewhere and something gets passed the guards, own it and fix the situation. Like how Ubisoft made the DLC free for Unity. That was good…

    Love that Miyamoto quote, BTdubs!

    • Agreed /X/! This is an unfortunate model, but fortunately not every company is this way. You would think that the companies that have the ‘taking over the world’ mindset would learn from their mistakes. If they don’t learn now, it could hurt them in the future!

  4. Kirk Morgan Hess says:

    I think the problem is companies rushing to meet fans. You quoted Shigeru Miyamoto, and a great game that took its time was Nintendo’s Breath of the Wild. They had a release date, and then didn’t rush it. When they knew it would take longer to finish than they said they were open about it, told us it would take longer, and then kept working. It was game of the year when it came out. Developers need to recognize that. A good game sales itself, and development should not be rushed to meet a sales date. Open communication and honesty to fans creates patience I think, and results in a much better game.

    • Thanks for the response Kirk! I agree with you, letting the fans know what’s going on can make a huge difference when it comes to release of games. I personally feel as if they are willing to communicate that, then they are showing they care about their community.

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